Posts Tagged ‘Department of Transportation’

Michael Green Contact Tile

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Feb. 28, 2017) AAA’s President and CEO, Marshall Doney, has issued the following statement in response to President Trump’s comments about infrastructure during his first address to a joint session of Congress:

“Tonight, AAA is pleased that President Trump has highlighted the pressing need to improve our nation’s aging infrastructure systems. Cooperation from policymakers on both sides of the aisle will be critical in identifying a long term funding strategy to support and improve a transportation system that reduces congestion, improves roads and helps to keep everyone on the road safer.

A strong and robust transportation system supports the nation’s economy and provides Americans with more choices on where to live, work and engage with their communities. The Federal Highway Administration recently revealed that drivers are logging more miles on the road than ever before. This trend only highlights the growing demands facing America’s roads, bridges and tunnels in the future and justifies the need for greater investment in transportation infrastructure today. Funding the nation’s transportation system might very well require a variety of alternative options and new financing proposals that have yet to be fully evaluated. AAA looks forward to working with the president and members of both parties in the House and Senate to ensure that America’s infrastructure system is safe, reliable and efficient.

Michael Green Contact Tile

(WASHINGTON, January 31, 2017) AAA’s President and CEO, Marshall Doney, has issued the following statement in response to the confirmation of Elaine Chao as U.S. Transportation Secretary:

“I commend the Senate for moving swiftly to confirm Elaine Chao as the nation’s 18th U.S. Secretary of Transportation. Ms. Chao’s commitment to public service is commendable and her previous service at U.S. DOT will serve her well as she advances the department’s goals to enhance the safety, efficiency and accessibility of the nation’s transportation system. AAA stands ready to work with Secretary Chao to identify solutions for transportation safety and funding challenges and intelligent transportation systems, automation and other shared priorities. AAA firmly believes that significant, additional investments are needed to maintain existing infrastructure and to enhance the nation’s system. We look forward to working with Secretary Chao to ensure that our transportation system is safe, reliable and efficient, and that the nation remains globally competitive in a rapidly changing economy.”

Michael Green Contact TileWASHINGTON, D.C, (March 30, 2015) – AAA’s CEO Bob Darbelnet has issued the following statement in response to the Department of Transportation’s introduction of the GROW America Act today, a bill to fund transportation and infrastructure improvements over six years.

“As states begin springtime road construction projects, AAA is pleased that Secretary Foxx and President Obama have put forward a blueprint for improving the nation’s roads and bridges. This transportation and infrastructure proposal promises to keep America globally competitive in a rapidly changing world.

“The goals of the GROW AMERICA Act are commendable.  For example, additional funding for NHTSA and its vehicle recall program should enhance driver safety. Improving performance incentives to maintain the quality of the nation’s roads and bridges should also help to restore driver confidence that highways are managed wisely and efficiently.

“Despite these improvements, we are disappointed the bill fails to identify a long-term and viable funding source to address the Highway Trust Fund shortfall.  Repatriation of corporate overseas profits might provide an infusion of money for construction and repairs, but it’s a temporary solution that does not solve our funding crisis.

“AAA continues to believe that increasing the federal gas tax is the most effective and sustainable way to pay for roads and bridges in the near term, provided the additional funds are invested in improvements that ease congestion and increase safety.”

Mariam AliEven as technology advances, motorists identify range anxiety and lack of charging locations as top reasons to not drive electric

ORLANDO, Fla., (May 9, 2013) – The number of electric vehicle charging station locations has increased 959 percent since the debut of the Nissan Leaf in 2010. Despite that, eight out of ten U.S. adults are unsure about or unlikely to buy an electric vehicle (EV) and 30 percent of them say it is due to mileage limitations and availability of charging stations locations, according to a survey by AAA.

“There have been major advancements in electric vehicle technology and the supporting infrastructure,” said John Nielsen, AAA Managing Director of Automotive Engineering and Repair, “However, it will take time and education for the general motoring public to understand just how far these vehicles have come, and recognize the many resources available to those who drive them.”

Modern EVs typically have a range of 60-100 miles, more than enough for the average driver’s daily commute which the U.S. Department of Transportation says is around 16 miles one way. As to recharging, the U.S. Department of Energy reports there are now more than 5,800 charging stations available for public use. The agency has aggressively promoted expansion of the electric vehicle charging infrastructure using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Additional findings from the AAA survey, fielded in July 2012, show that 26 percent of U.S. adults who are unsure about or unlikely to buy an electric vehicle (EV) cite the higher cost in general of an electric vehicle (i.e. buying, maintaining) as a reason they would be unlikely/undecided to make such a purchase.   “Battery improvements, increased competition, and economies of scale are all likely to drive down costs associated with buying an EV,” Nielsen continued. “With no need to change oil or filters and less brake system wear and tear, maintaining an EV is actually more affordable than a conventional vehicle.”

As joint efforts by government, private groups, and the automotive industry bring the charging picture into focus, AAA’s commitment to meeting member’s needs continues through electric vehicle roadside assistance. In 2011, AAA facilitated an extensive electric vehicle charging research and development program to help test EV charging as a roadside solution. AAA’s specially equipped road service trucks – capable of providing EV charging in approximately 15 minutes for about 10 miles of driving – are currently being tested in select markets across the country. The trucks can also provide traditional roadside services to members with any type of vehicle.

Working with the Electric Drive Transportation Association, AAA recently added EV content to their public information website, AAA Exchange. The new content provides basic information about electric vehicles that will help motorists determine whether an electric vehicle might be right for them. The materials also examine the various types of electric vehicles available, and help consumers understand the important differences that come with owning and operating an electric car.

Electric vehicle drivers looking for a public charging station in their area can consult the online AAA TripTik Travel Planner or the AAA Mobile application for smartphones. About 400 EV charging stations are located at AAA/CAA Approved hotels, restaurants and attractions. A green “plug” icon accompanies listings for these establishments in club-customizable AAA.com Travel Guides and 2013 Tour Book guides, which also denote stations available at AAA club offices.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 53 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

AAA prepares drivers for what to do when new vehicles don’t include a spare tire.

ORLANDO, Fla., (January 25, 2012) – Buying a car can be a stressful experience. One thing buyers could depend upon was that the new vehicle they were about to purchase included a spare tire. That may not always be the case. To meet new government fuel efficiency standards some vehicle manufactures are omitting heavy spare tires and equipping new vehicles with an emergency sealant and inflator kit or tires that if damaged can run reasonable distances without air.

In 2010, the Department of Transportation and Environmental Protection Agency established new corporate average fuel economy standards for vehicle model years 2012 to 2016. The new standards are set at a combined 29.7 mpg for the 2012 model year, increasing to 34.1 mpg by 2016.

Achieving these standards will require many changes to the vehicles we drive.  One area of focus is to reduce the weight of vehicles without compromising occupant safety.  A spare tire, related tools and a jack can weigh more than 40 pounds. That may seem like a small amount but every little bit helps and unlike other weight saving changes, it doesn’t add cost to the vehicle.  

“Unfortunately many vehicle owners may be unaware that their vehicle has no spare tire until they experience a flat tire.” says John Nielsen, AAA National Director of Auto Buying, and Consumer Information. “Consumers should review their owner’s manual and emergency maintenance supplies they have in the vehicle and be informed about alternatives to a spare to prevent panic or a delay when encountering a flat tire.”

AAA recommends the following to ensure you are informed and prepared:

  • Inspect the car and consult your owner’s manual. If the vehicle has a spare, be sure it is properly inflated and stowed. If you cannot locate a spare tire, ensure your vehicle has an alternate solution. Options include the run-flat tires that allow the car to be driven to a safe location or an emergency sealant and inflator kit.  
  • If you carry a sealant, AAA recommends that you check the date and replace it every five years or after its use. Sealant can become less effective with age.

AAA members needing assistance with a flat tire can request roadside rescue at (800) AAA-HELP or by downloading the smartphone app, AAA Roadside. AAA members can also eliminate the stress of buying a new car by using the AAA Auto Buying Tools App. Build the car you want, including color and trim level, and the AAA app will give you information on available options, available incentives, crash safety ratings, AAA reviews, images and more.  

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 53 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

Washington, D.C., May 25, 2011

AAA supports today’s announcement by the Obama Administration unveiling the new model year 2013 fuel label that informs consumers about a vehicle’s annual fuel costs/savings and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Leading up to today’s announcement, AAA submitted comments supporting these consumer improvements.

“Reducing fuel costs and being mindful of the vehicle’s environmental impact are top of mind for many Americans these days.This new and enhanced label will arm consumers with more information in order to make informed purchasing decisions when it comes to new vehicles,” said AAA President and CEO Robert L. Darbelnet.

Last November, AAA provided written comments to the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the proposed label changes. AAA viewed these changes as important because consumers deserve easy to understand, comprehensive information on the energy cost savings and environmental impact of vehicles while making purchasing decisions. AAA has been active on the issue of accurate and comprehensive vehicle labeling for many years.In 2006, AAA was one of the leading consumer groups that worked closely with the EPA to revise its testing procedures for fuel economy to ensure that vehicle stickers provided motorists with accurate, real-world miles-per-gallon information.

With today’s announcement, AAA plans to help educate the public about the new vehicle labels through AAA’s member magazines, websites and social media channels. “AAA will be informing the public about the improved features of the new vehicle labels and continuing to advocate on behalf of our members on fuel conservation and efficiency issues,” Darbelnet said.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 52 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

WASHINGTON, D.C., September 17, 2010

In an effort to curb distracted driving, young drivers across the country pledge to take two seconds to turnoff their wireless devices before getting behind the wheel to drive

Nancy WhiteYoung drivers nationwide are pledging to take two seconds to turn off their cell phones and other wireless devices before getting behind the wheel to drive today, as part of National Two-Second Turnoff Day. The day is being promoted by AAA, Seventeen magazine and the U.S. Department of Transportation with events in Washington, D.C., and New York. According to a recent survey by AAA and Seventeen, almost nine in 10 teen drivers (86 percent) have driven while distracted, even though 84 percent of teen drivers know it’s dangerous.

“Taking your eyes off of the road for two seconds doubles your risk of a crash or near-crash and National Two-Second Turnoff Day is an opportunity for young drivers nationwide to take control of their own safety behind the wheel by making the wise and responsible decision not to drive while distracted,” said Kathleen Marvaso, AAA vice-president of public affairs. “National Two-Second Turnoff Day is a reminder to drivers of all ages that they should keep their eyes and attention on the road while driving at all times.”

Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for teen drivers, and an August 2010 survey of teen distracted driving behaviors released by AAA and Seventeen magazine revealed some disturbing facts, including:

  • Of those teen drivers surveyed, 60 percent have talked on a cell phone and 28 percent have sent a text message while driving.
  • Teen drivers who text while driving reported sending, on average, 23 text messages while driving in the past month.
  • More than one-third of teen drivers (36 percent) believe they have been involved in a near-crash because of their own or someone else’s distracted driving.

“Today’s teens are heavily distracted by their cell phones and a car full of friends while they are driving,” said Seventeen magazine Editor in Chief Ann Shoket. “We hope that on this Two-Second Turnoff Day we are showing them how easy it is to put down the phone and keep their focus on the road so everyone gets where they are going safely.”

“Teen drivers are some of the most vulnerable drivers on the road due to inexperience, and adding cell phones to the mix only compounds the dangers,” said National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator David Strickland. “As we prepare to convene the second national Distracted Driving Summit in Washington, D.C. next week, it is heartening to see so many young people pledging to turn off their phones when they’re behind the wheel.”

AAA offers several tools to help parents discuss the dangers of distracted driving with teens including StartSmart, an interactive program to help parents and teens safely navigate the learning-to-drive process. For more information on the free online program, visit TeenDriving.AAA.com.

AAA has also partnered with MonkeySee.com, an instructional video website, to produce eight educational videos on how to avoid common distractions behind the wheel. These videos can be found at MonkeySee.com.

“AAA hopes that today’s events are a springboard for further engagement and discussion on the topic of distracted driving,” Marvaso added. “Through our campaign to enact bans on texting while driving in all 50 states and other public outreach initiatives, our association has made distracted driving prevention and education a top priority.”

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides nearly 52 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

 

WASHINGTON, D.C., September 16, 2010

Troy GreenYoung drivers nationwide are pledging to take two seconds to turn off their cell phones and other wireless devices before getting behind the wheel to drive today, as part of National Two-Second Turnoff Day.

WHAT: The day is being promoted by AAA, Seventeen magazine and the U.S. Department of Transportation with events in Washington, D.C., and New York.  According to a recent survey by AAA and Seventeen, almost nine in 10 teen drivers (86 percent) have driven while distracted, even though 84 percent of teen drivers know it’s dangerous. 

AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety research shows that taking your eyes off the road for only two seconds doubles your risk of a crash. It takes two seconds or less to turn off your phone. With National Two-Second Turnoff Day we are asking drivers everywhere to make the conscious, responsible decision to reduce driver distraction by turning off your cell phone before starting your car.


WHO:
David Strickland, NHTSA
Yolanda Cade, AAA
Michele Mount, General Federation of Women’s Clubs

WHEN:

Friday, September 17, 2010, at 10:02 a.m.
WHERE: Freedom Plaza
At the corner of 14th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 

National Press Club Ballroom (inclement weather location)
529 14th Street Northwest
Washington, DC

CONTACT: Troy Green, AAA
O: 202.942.2082
C: 202.577.9735
trjohnson@national.aaa.com 

Marisa Ollins, Seventeen
212.649.2577
mollins@hearst.com

NEW YORK, NY,  August 2, 2010

Seventeen, AAA and The Department of Transportation team up in a “Two-Second Turnoff Day” to stop texting while driving

Nancy WhiteTeen drivers often understand that shooting a quick text message, playing with their radio, or eating while driving is dangerous. However, the overwhelming majority of teen drivers engage in distracted driving behaviors anyway, according to a recent survey by AAA and Seventeen magazine. Almost nine in 10 teenage drivers (86 percent) have driven while distracted, even though 84 percent of teen drivers know it’s dangerous. Featured in the September issue of Seventeen magazine, the results are based on a survey conducted in May of nearly 2,000 male and female teen drivers ages 16 – 19. Seventeen magazine and AAA set out to discover what risky behaviors teen drivers were engaging in while behind the wheel—and how they justify this dangerous behavior.

Of those surveyed, 73 percent have adjusted their radio/CD/MP3 player, 61 percent have eaten food, and 60 percent have talked on a cell phone while driving. The reasons teen drivers think it’s fine to engage in these distractions are varied: 41 percent think their action will only take a split second; 35 percent don’t think they’ll get hurt; 34 percent said they’re used to multitasking; and 32 percent don’t think that anything bad will happen to them.

“It’s great that so many teens are able to identify the bad driving habits that will put them and their friends in danger. But the bigger challenge we face now is to give them the tools they need to stop driving while distracted,” says Ann Shoket, editor in chief of Seventeen magazine. “It’s our responsibility to keep our 13 million readers out of harm’s way.”

Even as passengers, teen drivers worry about distracted driving, with nearly four out of 10 (38 percent) saying they have been afraid they were going to get hurt because they were the passenger of a distracted driver. More than one-third of teen drivers (36 percent) believe they have been involved in a near-crash because of their own or someone else’s distracted driving.

“Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for teen drivers and the proliferation of distracted driving among teens is a challenge all of us must face head-on,” said AAA President and CEO Robert L. Darbelnet. “Because of their lack of driving experience and penchant to take risks, it’s imperative that teen drivers – like all drivers – remain focused behind the wheel at all times. AAA is pleased to partner with Seventeen to spread the anti-distracted driving message and help keep teen drivers safe.”

Texting while driving is among the riskiest of common driving distractions. Teen drivers are still developing safe driving skills and should limit unnecessary risks, according to AAA. Nonetheless, the survey revealed that teen drivers who text while driving sent, on average, 23 text messages while driving in the past month. Nearly 6,000 people died in 2008 in crashes involving a distracted or inattentive driver and more than a half million were injured, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

According to AAA, taking your eyes off of the road for two seconds doubles your risk of getting into a crash. On September 17th, Seventeen magazine, AAA and the Department of Transportation are asking everyone to save a life and participate in the Seventeen Two-Second Turnoff Day by taking two seconds to turn off their cell phone before driving. Instead of spending two seconds looking away from the road while driving distracted, use those two seconds to turn off your phone before you get behind the wheel.

For more information on keeping teens safer on the road, visit AAAExchange.com.

Seventeen (www.seventeen.com) is the best-selling monthly teen magazine, reaching more than 13 million readers every month. In each issue, Seventeen reports on the latest in fashion, beauty, health and entertainment, as well as information and advice on the complex real-life issues that young women face every day. Readers can also interact with the brand on the digital front, with Seventeen mobile (m.seventeen.com). In addition to its U.S. flagship, Seventeen publishes 13 editions around the world. Seventeen is published by Hearst Magazines, a unit of Hearst Corporation (www.hearst.com) and one of the world’s largest publishers of monthly magazines, with nearly 200 editions around the world, including 15 U.S. titles and 20 magazines in the United Kingdom, published through its wholly owned subsidiary, The National Magazine Company Limited. HearstMagazines is the leading publisher of monthly magazines in the U.S. in terms of total circulation (ABC, Dec. 2009) and reaches 73 million adults (MRI,Fall 2009).

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides nearly 52 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at www.aaa.com.

WASHINGTON, D.C., January 26, 2010

AAA welcomes today’s announcement by US DOT to prohibit texting while driving for commercial motor vehicle (CMV) operators.

Troy GreenThis action reinforces the fact that any form of distracted driving by any driver is a serious traffic safety issue.

“AAA appreciates thecommitment ofSecretary LaHood and Administrator Ferro to address this serious traffic safety hazard,” said AAA Vice President of Public Affairs Kathleen Marvaso. “AAA’s state advocacy agenda for 2010 includes enacting texting while driving bans in all 50 states.”

Texting while driving presents a danger to all road users due to the significant time involved in writing, reading, and sending messages – all activities that take the driver’s eyes off the road – in addition to the mental distraction caused by taking one’s mind off the task at hand.Ample research illustrates the severely degrading effect that sending a text message has on driving performance.

“AAA strongly urges all drivers to focus on the important task of driving by avoiding all behaviors that result in distracted driving,”Marvaso added. “We look forward to continuing to work with the department on traffic safety issues, especially in the area of curbing distracting driving.”

For more information on AAA’s 50-state campaign to ban texting while driving, please visit AAA.com/publicaffairs.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 51 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

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