Posts Tagged ‘New York’

Michael Green

(WASHINGTON, November 15, 2013) “The EPA’s proposal to decrease ethanol requirements will help drivers by preventing a surge in gas prices or the premature expansion of E15 gasoline sales. While we would like to increase the use of alternative fuels, it is a plain fact that the Renewable Fuels Standard’s original targets are unreachable without putting motorists and their vehicles at risk.

“The EPA has finally put consumers first. Their proposal will support the continued development of alternative fuels, while also recognizing the needs of the millions of people that drive every day. Today’s proposal is an important step in the right direction, but it does not go far enough. Suggesting a range for 2014 targets does not guarantee that motorists will be protected from the risk of higher ethanol blends. We encourage the EPA to act quickly to finalize specific targets that help protect drivers nationwide.

“The vast majority of cars on the roads today are not designed to run on gasoline containing more than 10 percent ethanol. While ethanol has the potential to support the economy and reduce the reliance on fossil fuels, it is irresponsible to mandate more ethanol than cars can safely use.”

More than 90 percent of the vehicles on the road today are not approved by manufacturers to use E15, including most 2001-2013 models. E15 is only approved for use by automakers in flex-fuel engines, 2001 and newer Porsches, and selected 2012 and newer vehicles where it is clearly specified in the owner’s manual. While new models increasingly can use E15 gasoline, previous makes and models were never designed to use the fuel. It will still take at least another decade before the bulk of the fleet will be E15 compatible given that the average vehicle remains in use for more than 11 years.

 

Michael Green Contact TileBob Darbelnet Will Testify Regarding E15 Gasoline to Congressional Subcommittee

Additional Resources

WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 23, 2013) – AAA President & CEO Bob Darbelnet will testify today to a Congressional subcommittee that the EPA should consider whether target volumes to the Renewable Fuels Standard can be met without putting consumers at risk.

“I would urge Congress to keep American consumers front of mind when reviewing the RFS requirements for 2014,” continued Darbelnet.  “If the only way to meet the RFS requirement is to introduce E15 gasoline before consumers are educated and consensus is reached on which vehicles can safely use the fuel, then the RFS should be modified.”

The House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Energy and Power is conducting the hearing to examine the Renewable Fuels Standard, a program created under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to establish a renewable fuel volume mandate. AAA has urged regulators and the industry to stop the sale of E15 gasoline until motorists are better protected due to the strong likelihood of consumer confusion and the potential for voided warranties and vehicle damage.

“The number of states where E15 is sold has doubled in recent months despite continuing evidence that drivers are not aware of the fuel and could be unknowingly putting their cars in jeopardy,” continued Darbelnet. “AAA is not opposed to either ethanol or the RFS, but we remain very concerned with the way that E15 has been brought to market and is being sold to consumers.”

The subcommittee hearing is scheduled for July 23 at 10:00 AM in 2123 Rayburn House Office Building.

AAA believes that ethanol-blended fuels have the potential to provide motorists a clear choice at the pump that supports jobs, promotes energy independence and reduces fuel costs.  Both E10 and E85 provide options for consumers at this point, and AAA would support a motorists’ right to choose E15 once basic thresholds have been met regarding consumer protections. More than 95 percent of the gasoline sold in the United States is E10, which contains up to 10 percent ethanol. E85, which contains up to 85 percent ethanol, is designed for use by flex-fuel vehicles.

A AAA survey last fall found that only 12 million out of the 240 million light-duty vehicles on the roads were approved by manufacturers to use E15. Thirteen manufacturers stated that the use of E15 may void warranty coverage. AAA’s automotive engineering experts believe that sustained use of E15 could result in costly problems such as accelerated engine wear and failure, fuel-system damage and false “check engine” lights in some cars. An overwhelming 95 percent of consumers surveyed by AAA were not familiar with E15, indicating a strong likelihood of consumer confusion leading to misfueling.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 53 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

Michael Green Contact Tile(WASHINGTON, July 16, 2013) AAA’s Chris Plaushin (director, federal relations) is testifying before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee today during a hearing “to explore the effects of ongoing changes in domestic oil production, refining and distribution on U.S. gasoline and fuel prices.” Chris Plaushin’s testimony is available here.

Additional Resources

Michael Green Contact Tile

 

 

 

 

 

(WASHINGTON, February 28, 2013)

Highest Increase in Gas Prices to Begin Year on Record

  • The national average price of gasoline has increased 49 cents per gallon since the beginning of the year, which is the highest price increase through the end of February on record. Gas prices began 2013 at $3.29 per gallon and have climbed a total of 46 days to a national average of $3.78 per gallon. The previous record through the end of February was a rise of 46 cents per gallon in 2012.
  • The dramatic increase has resulted in the highest average prices ever for this time of year. The average price of gas in February was $3.65 per gallon, which was ten cents higher than the previous record for the month set in 2012. Today’s national average of $3.782 per gallon is five cents higher than the average a year ago.
  • “Gas prices increased at a dramatically faster pace than expected in February,” said Avery Ash, AAA spokesman. “Motorists unfortunately are paying more for gasoline than ever at this time of year, and it is primarily because of a decline in refinery production and higher futures prices.”
  • Many refineries decreased fuel production in January and February to conduct seasonal maintenance and facility upgrades. Along with unplanned refinery issues, this has resulted in the lowest rate of crude oil processing since April 2011. Decreased production squeezes gasoline supplies, which leads to higher pump prices for motorists.
  • The anticipated transition to summer-blend gasoline also has contributed to higher prices. The switchover takes place every year and is required to help meet local air quality standards. Summer-blend gasoline costs more to produce and can lead to logistical and distribution challenges.
  • The sharp rise in gas prices has come despite a recent drop in the price of crude oil. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) oil futures are about $14 per barrel less than a year ago, which reduces the cost of refining gasoline.

Gas-Prices-to-Begin-the-Year-2011-2013

 

Gasoline Likely to Peak at Lower Average Price than Recent Years

  • AAA expects gas prices to peak at a lower national average than last year’s high of $3.94 per gallon. While seasonal gas prices have recently peaked in April or May, it is possible that prices will peak even earlier this year.
  • “There is a lot of uncertainty on where gas prices will go over the next few weeks, but hopefully the worst of the price spikes are behind us for now,” continued Ash. “There is still refinery maintenance to be completed and most of the country must transition to summer-blend gasoline, so motorists are likely to face continued high prices in the weeks ahead.”
  • Despite the spike in gasoline prices, WTI crude oil has dropped almost $5 per barrel in recent weeks as a result of record-high supplies and concerns about the global economy.
  • The national average price of gas has increased in March for nine years in a row, indicating that seasonal supply and demand factors for this time of year can have a significant effect on gas prices.

US-Map-February-2013-fuel-prices

 

Gas Prices Vary by More than $1 per Gallon Across the Country

  • Gas prices vary by more than a $1 per gallon between the most expensive and cheapest states. The lowest gas prices are in the Rocky Mountain region, which is supplied by refineries with access to relatively cheap crude oil. The most expensive prices in the continental U.S. are in Calif. and N.Y., which have the highest gasoline taxes in the nation.
  • Approximately 60 million Americans (nearly 20 percent) today live in a state where gas prices average more than $4 a gallon. Only about eight million Americans (three percent) live in a state where gas is less than $3.50 per gallon on average.
  • The five states with the highest averages today include: Hawaii ($4.37), Calif. ($4.24), Alaska ($4.02), N.Y. ($4.01) and Conn. ($3.99). The five states with the lowest averages today include: Wyo. ($3.29), Mont. ($3.29), Utah ($3.43), Idaho ($3.45) and N.M. ($3.49).

Michael Green Contact TileHearing to highlight need for consumer protections, education and additional research on E15

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Feb. 26, 2013) – AAA President & CEO Robert L. Darbelnet will testify today before the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology’s Subcommittee on Environment that regulators and industry should suspend the sale of E15 gasoline until motorists are better protected. AAA will highlight the inadequate consumer protections and education efforts to date and will express support for additional testing by the National Academy of Sciences.

“Congress’ decision to examine potential problems associated with the sale of E15 is encouraging news for motorists,” said Darbelnet. “Most drivers are unaware of the potentially harmful effects of E15 and have not been properly educated about this new fuel entering the market.”

Additional Resources

  • Click here to listen to a AAA interview with Robert L. Darbelnet on E15

The hearing will examine the Environmental Protection Agency’s recent decision to allow the sale of E15, a blend of gasoline containing up to 15 percent ethanol. The subcommittee scheduled the hearing partly in response to AAA’s recent findings that E15 may cause consumer confusion, void warranties and contribute to vehicle damage.

“AAA is not opposed to ethanol, but we are against the way E15 has been introduced and sold to consumers,” continued Darbelnet. “We welcome the committee’s support today as AAA calls for additional impartial research and for regulators and industry to suspend the sale of E15 gasoline until motorists are properly educated and protected.”

The subcommittee hearing, “Mid-Level Ethanol Blends: Consumer and Technical Research Needs,” is scheduled for Feb. 26 at 2:00 PM EST in 2318 Rayburn House Office Building.

A AAA survey last fall found that only 12 million out of the 240 million light-duty vehicles on the roads today are approved by manufacturers to use E15. Five manufacturers stated their warranties would not cover fuel-related claims caused by E15, and eight additional manufacturers stated that E15 did not comply with fuel requirements in owners’ manuals and may void warranty coverage.

AAA’s automotive engineering experts believe that sustained use of E15 could result in costly problems such as accelerated engine wear and failure, fuel-system damage and false “check engine” lights in some cars. An overwhelming 95 percent of consumers surveyed by AAA were not familiar with E15, indicating a strong likelihood of consumer confusion leading to misfueling.

Both E10 and E85 provide options for consumers at this point. Ethanol-blended fuels have the potential to support American jobs, promote American energy independence and save Americans money. More than 95 percent of the gasoline sold in the United States is E10, which contains up to 10 percent ethanol. E85, which contains up to 85 percent ethanol, is designed for use by flex-fuel vehicles.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 53 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

 

WASHINGTON, January 31, 2013

 

 

 

 

U.S. Motorists Pay Second Highest Gas Prices on Record for January

  • The national average price of gasoline in January was $3.32 per gallon, which was the second highest average on record for the month. This also represents the first monthly average below year-ago levels in six months. The highest recorded prices in January were in 2012, when the monthly average was $3.37 per gallon.
  • “Gas prices in January historically are among the least expensive of the year because of lower demand and the use of winter-blend gasoline,” said Avery Ash, AAA spokesman. “While few of us would claim that gas prices are cheap, at least most motorists paid a little less compared to last year.”
  • The national average price of gasoline increased 13 cents (4 percent) a gallon in January, which was the first monthly increase since August. Gas prices nationally have increased 14 days in a row for a total of 22 days during the month. Gas prices increased at a slower pace than in January 2012, when the national average increased 17 cents (5 percent) a gallon.
  • The lowest state averages for January were in the Rockies, where relatively cheap crude oil, a glut of local gasoline supplies and limited pipeline capacity out of the region helped keep prices low. The average monthly price of gasoline in Wyo. ($2.87), Colo. ($2.91) and Utah ($2.92) were the first state monthly averages under $3 per gallon since January 2012.
  • Drivers in the Northeast continue paying among the highest prices in the continental U.S. because local production and supplies still have not recovered from Hurricane Sandy. Higher than average state gasoline taxes also contribute to higher prices in the region. Motorists in N.Y. paid an average of $3.74 per gallon for the month, while the average in Conn. was $3.69 per gallon.
  • Drivers in the Midwest saw the highest price increases for January as a result of rising crude oil costs in the region and decreased gasoline supplies. States with the highest monthly price increases included Minn. (33¢), Ind. (24¢), Mich. (23¢) and Ill. (23¢).

AAA Expects Gas Prices to Rise in February Due to Refinery Actions

  • AAA expects the national average to increase in February due to seasonal refinery actions, but at a slower pace than in the previous two years when the average climbed by 29 cents per gallon (2012) and 27 cents per gallon (2011). Despite the expected slower overall pace, it is likely the national average will rise temporarily above year-ago levels in the coming days.
  • “Gas prices are expected to rise steadily as many refineries temporarily close for scheduled turnaround maintenance and as the industry begins the complicated process of switching over to summer blends of gasoline,” continued Ash. “Various summer-gasoline blends are required in many regions to meet local air quality standards, but the fuels cost more to produce and the changeover process can disrupt supplies in the spring.”
  • Gas prices in February increased at a quick pace over the past couple of years due to higher oil costs caused primarily by civil war in Libya (2011) and geopolitical tensions with Iran (2012). While gas prices this February are expected to increase at a slower rate, major events such as an unexpected refinery outage, increased unrest in North Africa or changes in the global economy could affect this month’s forecast. The national average in February has increased nine out of the previous ten years.
  • The national average should rise steadily through April or May as the switch to summer-blend gasoline continues and with an increase in demand this spring. AAA expects gas prices this spring will peak at a lower national average than last year’s high of $3.94 per gallon, which occurred on April 5 and 6.
  • Gasoline prices in the Northeast will remain among the highest in the country following the planned closure in February of Hess’ Port Reading, N.J. refinery, which accounts for 7.5 percent of Northeast gasoline production. The closure of this refinery further reduces production in the region, which means that a larger percentage of gasoline in the heavily populated Northeast will be supplied by Gulf Coast, Midwest and overseas refineries. The reduction in refinery production places Northeastern motorists at increased risk of price spikes this year if refinery or pipeline disruptions strike the region.

 

Today’s Gas Prices

  • Today’s national gas price average is $3.423 a gallon, which is 2.9 cents more than yesterday and 10.2 cents more than a week ago. Today’s national average is the highest price since Nov. 25, 2012.
  • Motorists nationally are paying an average of 2.7 cents per gallon less on gas than last year. This is the 27th day in a row that gas prices have been less expensive than last year.
  • The five states with the highest averages today include: Hawaii ($4.11), N.Y. ($3.78), Calif. ($3.76), Conn. ($3.75) and Alaska ($3.69). The five states with the lowest averages today include: Wyo. ($2.90), Mont. ($3.01), Colo. ($3.07), Utah ($3.09) and N.M. ($3.11).

AAA’s Daily Fuel Gauge Report is updated daily at www.FuelGaugeReport.AAA.com with average national, state and local retail prices for gasoline, diesel and E-85. Every day up to 120,000 stations are surveyed based on credit card swipes and direct feeds in cooperation with the Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) and Wright Express for unmatched statistical reliability. All average retail prices in this report are for a gallon of regular, unleaded gasoline. For more information, contact Michael Green at 202-942-2082, mgreen@national.aaa.com.

 

 

WASHINGTON, December 31, 2012 -

 

 

 

 

 

Gas Prices in 2012 Most Expensive Year on Record

  • The national average price of gasoline in 2012 was $3.60 a gallon, which is the most expensive annual average on record. The previous annual record was $3.51 a gallon set in 2011, while the third most expensive year for gas prices was 2008, when the average was $3.25 a gallon.
  • “Record high gas prices have made this the most expensive year yet for motorists,” said Avery Ash, AAA spokesman. “Factors as volatile as major hurricanes, refinery outages and tension in the Middle East resulted in significant frustration for people filling up their cars.”
  • The national average has broken a daily record high for 134 consecutive days for a total a 248 days in 2012. Motorists paid record-high gas prices on 68 percent of the days during the year.
  • The highest daily national average of the year was $3.94 a gallon on April 5 and 6, while the lowest daily national average was $3.22 a gallon on Dec. 20.
  • The states with the most expensive annual averages for 2012 included Hawaii ($4.31), Alaska ($4.09), Calif. ($4.03), N.Y. ($3.90) and Conn. ($3.90). The states with the cheapest annual averages included S.C. ($3.35), Mo. ($3.38), Miss. ($3.39), Tenn. ($3.40) and Okla. ($3.41).
  • The highest daily statewide average of the year was $4.67 in Calif. on Oct. 9, while the lowest daily statewide average was $2.91 a gallon in South Carolina on July 3.
  • The daily average for regular gasoline dropped below $3.00 per gallon in only eight states at some point during the year, while daily averages increased above $4.00 per gallon in 11 states (and Washington D.C.) at some point.

 

December Gas Prices Fall to Lowest Average of the Year

  • Gas prices averaged $3.30 a gallon nationally in December, which was the lowest monthly average of the year.
  • The national average declined 11 cents per gallon (3.25 percent) in December and declined on 22 days during the month.
  • Gas prices nationally have fallen nearly 58 cents a gallon (14.96 percent) on average since September 14, the day before much of the United States began the transition to winter-blend gasoline. Gas prices have dropped as a result of decreased demand, increased supplies and the switchover to less expensive winter-blend fuels.

Fiscal Cliff Adding Uncertainty to Gas Prices in 2013

  • A failure to reach a fiscal cliff deal could push the economy into a renewed recession, which would drive down gas prices as a result of decreased demand and weaker commodities prices including oil and gas. As a result of continued negotiations in Washington, predictions about gas prices in 2013 remain very uncertain.
  • Even if a fiscal cliff deal is reached, AAA predicts that gas prices in 2013 will remain high, but are likely to be cheaper than in 2012 due to increased domestic crude oil production and that demand is expected to remain lower than in recent years.
  • “What happens with gas prices this year will be impacted by decisions in Washington this month,” continued Ash.  “Yet no matter what happens in Congress, AAA is optimistic that gas prices will be less expensive than in 2012.”

Today’s Gas Prices (Dec. 31, 2012)

  • Today’s national average price of gasoline is $3.29 per gallon, which is 4.5 cents more than a week ago and 1.6 cents more than a year ago.
  • The five states with the highest prices include: Hawaii ($3.99), N.Y. ($3.74), Conn. ($3.68), Calif. ($3.57) and Vt. ($3.55). The five states with the lowest prices include: Wyo. ($2.98), Colo. ($3.01), Okla. ($3.02), Utah ($3.03) and Mo. ($3.03).

AAA’s average gas prices are updated daily at FuelGaugeReport.AAA.com with average national, state and local retail prices for gasoline, diesel and E-85. Every day up to 120,000 stations are surveyed based on credit card swipes and direct feeds in cooperation with the Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) and Wright Express for unmatched statistical reliability. All average retail prices in this report are for a gallon of regular, unleaded gasoline.

Suspend Sale of E15 Gasoline

December 17th, 2012 by admin

By Robert L. Darbelnet, President and CEO of AAA

Published first in The Hill on Dec. 13, 2012

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and gasoline retailers should suspend the sale of E15 gasoline until more is done to protect consumers from the potential for costly auto damage and voided warranties.

Additional Resources

Research to date raises serious concerns that E15, a fuel blend consisting of 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline, could cause accelerated engine wear and failure, fuel system damage and other problems such as false “check engine” lights.

The potential damage could result in costly repairs for unsuspecting consumers. This is especially tough for most motorists given that only about 40 percent of Americans have enough in savings to afford a major auto repair.

In June, the EPA approved the use of E15, and a handful of gas stations in Nebraska, Iowa and Kansas have begun to sell this fuel. There is a strong likelihood that retailers will market E15 in additional states soon unless regulators take immediate action to protect consumers.

Nearly all of the gasoline sold in the United States today is E10, which contains up to ten percent ethanol, primarily produced from corn. The ethanol industry has lobbied hard to increase the amount of ethanol allowed in gasoline as a way to increase sales and help meet the Renewable Fuels Standard.

AAA’s concern with E15 is not about ethanol. In fact, AAA believes that ethanol-blended fuels have the potential to save Americans money and reduce the nation’s dependency on fossil fuels. The problem is that available research, including the EPA’s exhaust emissions tests, is not sufficient evidence that E15 is safe to use in most vehicles.

The ethanol industry’s response to reports of damage caused by E15 is that it is the most tested fuel in the EPA’s history.  The caveat to this assertion is that while the agency did test E15, their research focused primarily on exhaust emissions and associated components such as catalytic converters. While this research was consistent with the EPA’s mission, it never fully examined whether E15 might damage engines and fuel systems.

Some of those supporting E15 admit the fuel may cause damage. For example, the Renewable Fuels Association warned retailers that some underground storage tank systems, both new and used, exhibited reduced levels of safety and performance when exposed to E15. In addition, earlier this year the industry testified before Congress in support of legislation that proposed to give fuel producers blanket liability protections, while providing no protections to motorists. If the industry is not confident enough to take responsibility for the risks of E15, is it right that the risks be passed onto consumers?

Automakers advise they may void warranties for anyone using E15. Five manufacturers (BMW, Chrysler, Nissan, Toyota and Volkswagen) state their warranties will not cover E15 claims. Eight additional automakers (GM, Ford, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz and Volvo) state that E15 does not comply with fuel requirements specified in most owners’ manuals and may void warranties. It is difficult to comprehend why the EPA would choose to ignore all these warnings.

The automakers’ position is understandable given that most cars were never designed for E15. Only about five percent, or 12 million of the more than 240 million light-duty vehicles on U.S. roads today, are approved by manufacturers to use the fuel. These vehicles include flex-fuel models, 2001 and newer Porsches, 2012 and newer GM vehicles and 2013 Fords. So unless you drive a Porsche or a brand new car, you could be out of luck when it comes to E15.

The only responsible action to take now is to suspend the sale of E15 until consumers are better informed and protected at the pump. AAA did not come to this decision lightly. We arrived at this recommendation only after extensively reviewing the existing research, surveying automakers and conducting a national poll finding that only five percent of Americans had heard of E15.

The simple truth is that E15 is a product not yet ready for public consumption, and government regulators have an obligation to suspend sales until these issues are addressed.

AAA recommends the EPA, fuel producers and automakers collectively develop a long-term plan that promotes public education, while implementing improved labeling and warnings at the pump. Additional research also is necessary to better understand the full consequences of using E15 in older and newer vehicles.

AAA urges regulators and the renewable fuels industry to consider the interests of consumers first by immediately suspending the sale of E15 before American motorists are left footing the bill.


Gas Prices Drop Slowly in November to Lowest Average Since July

  • The national average price of gasoline dropped 11.9 cents a gallon (3.38 percent) in November. This was the fifth monthly decline in gas prices this year, and today’s national average of $3.387 a gallon is the lowest since July 12.
  • “Most motorists managed to save a little money on gasoline just in time for holiday shopping,” said Avery Ash, AAA spokesperson. “Prices unfortunately did not fall as quickly as most of us would have liked as a result of factors ranging from fighting in the Middle East to optimism over the ‘fiscal cliff.’”
  • The monthly average price of gas was $3.44 a gallon, which was the lowest monthly average since July. The national average price of gas declined for 25 days in November.
  • Gas prices nationally have fallen nearly 50 cents a gallon on average since September 14, the day before much of the United States began the transition to winter-blend gasoline.
  • Gas prices remain at record highs for this time of year despite recent declines. The national average has broken the daily record high on 106 consecutive days for a total of 220 days this year (65 percent).
  • The average annual price of gas for 2012 will be the most expensive on record. The annual average to date is $3.63 a gallon, which is 12 cents more than the current record high set in 2011. Gas prices nationally would need to average about $2.05 a gallon through the end of the year to not break the record.
  • The average price of gas in areas hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, including N.J., New York City and Long Island, have returned to pre-storm levels now that gas stations are receiving regular fuel shipments. Average gas prices have dropped 18 cents a gallon in N.J., 21 cents a gallon in New York City and 26 cents a gallon in Long Island from peak prices following the storm.

 

Gas Prices Likely to Drop through New Year’s Day

  • AAA predicts that the national average price of gas will slowly drop through the end of the year and average between $3.20-$3.40 a gallon by New Year’s Day. To date, the lowest daily average of the year is $3.28 a gallon from Jan. 1.
  • “Motorists may luck out and pay the lowest gas prices of 2012 by the time they celebrate New Year’s,” continued Ash. “However, there is a small chance that pump prices could rise or remain flat as a result of rising oil prices and other economic factors.”

 

Today’s Gas Prices (Dec. 3, 2012)

  • Today’s national average price of gasoline has slowly dropped 11 days in a row to $3.387 a gallon, which is 3.6 cents less than a week ago, but 10.7 cents more than a year ago.
  • The five states with the highest prices are: Hawaii ($4.047), N.Y. ($3.863), Alaska ($3.792), Conn. ($3.782) and Calif. ($3.698). The five states with the lowest prices are: Mo. ($3.140), Texas ($3.143), S.C. ($3.154), Okla. ($3.154) and Tenn. ($3.161).

AAA’s average gas prices are updated daily at FuelGaugeReport.AAA.com with average national, state and local retail prices for gasoline, diesel and E-85. Every day up to 120,000 stations are surveyed based on credit card swipes and direct feeds in cooperation with the Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) and Wright Express for unmatched statistical reliability. All average retail prices in this report are for a gallon of regular, unleaded gasoline.

(WASHINGTON, December 3, 2012) Today’s national average price for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline is $3.39. This price is four cents less expensive than one week ago and ten cents less than one month ago, but it is 11 cents more expensive than one year ago. Today’s price is the highest on record for this calendar day and continues the streak of daily record prices that began on August 20.

Over the last week, prices in every state except Missouri and Kansas have fallen, led by drops in the middle of the country. While these week-over-week declines were most pronounced in Ohio (-15.4 cents), Michigan (-12.3 cents) and Indiana (-11.7 cents), these states are also three of only four where motorists today are paying more than they were on the same day last month: Indiana (+6.7 cents), Kentucky (+4.4 cents), Ohio (+2.3 cents) and Michigan (+1.3 cents).

 

Nationally, the largest one-week decline in pump prices was at the end of October when the national average dropped 14 cents. The largest increase during a similar seven-day period was 15 cents per gallon as prices surged higher to end February. Volatility has been more dramatic in the Midwest, where drivers have seen some of the largest price swings in the nation this year. Motorists in the region were squeezed to begin August, as prices rose some 40 cents or more per gallon in just one week, following regional production and distribution glitches. Prices in these same states had dropped about 25 cents in a week only a month earlier at the end of June.

While national retail gas prices have declined each day during the past week, crude oil prices have increased slightly, as market attention has focused on the impact of the looming U.S. fiscal cliff and the broader health of the global economy. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil breached the $90 per barrel mark during intraday trading, but ultimately settled up just 18 cents at $89.09 per barrel at the close of formal trading on the NYMEX.  WTI has not settled above $90 per barrel since October 19.

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