Posts Tagged ‘AAA Auto Repair’

ORLANDO, Fla.,  August 30, 2011

Christie HydeAAA Auto Buying experts release list with variety of tailgating vehicle options from traditional trucks to hybrids to crossovers 
College football season kicks off this week and the NFL regular season will soon follow. For many Americans, that means it’s time to load up their car or truck for tailgating prior to the game. AAA Auto Buying experts are kicking off football season by releasing their list of top vehicle picks for tailgating.

“Tailgate parties are synonymous with football season. While some diehard fans will purchase an older vehicle and deck it out with their team colors and features specifically for tailgating, most fans head to the stadium in the vehicles they use every day,” said John Nielsen, AAA National Director of Auto Repair, Buying Services and Consumer Information.

Additional AAA Top Picks Lists:

“If you’re an avid tailgater and in the market for a new vehicle, AAA Auto Buying experts have compiled a list of vehicles you should check out before the big game.”

Tailgating vehicles are traditionally thought of as trucks and SUVs. For those football fans seeking a more traditional vehicle, AAA Auto Buying experts have three top picks:

Ford F-150 EcoBoost: For fans who like their tailgating vehicles to actually have a tailgate, AAA Auto Buying experts suggest the Ford F-150 EcoBoost. It’s a pickup truck with V-8 power and six-cylinder fuel economy. The extended and crew cabs make it easy to carry friends and family to the game in surprising comfort while the cargo box easily accommodates everything necessary for a great tailgating experience. The TrueCar national average selling price of the 2011 Ford F-150 SuperCab XLT is $32,245, 6.8 percent less than the MSRP.

Chevrolet Tahoe Hybrid: Fans seeking a slightly ‘greener’ vehicle for tailgating that still provides them with all the room they need for a good tailgating party should consider the Chevrolet Tahoe Hybrid. The cavernous interior provides ample room to carry fans and supplies to the big game. But for those who want a deluxe tailgating experience, the Tahoe’s generous towing rating makes it easy to haul a separate trailer filled with the ultimate tailgating supplies. The TrueCar national average selling price for the 2011 Chevrolet Tahoe Hybrid is $46,073, which is 11.6 percent less than the MSRP.

Chevrolet Avalanche: The Chevrolet Avalanche allows fans to enjoy an actual tailgate at their tailgating party while also being able to securely lock away their supplies when they head inside the stadium. The Avalanche has a unique combination of a crew cab pickup truck passenger cabin with a cargo box that can be locked and kept weather-tight. The TrueCar national average selling price for the 2011 Chevrolet Avalanche is $31,780, 14.7 percent less than MSRP

AAA Auto Buying experts recognize not all football fans may want a large truck or SUV for their everyday driving, and therefore named three less traditional tailgating vehicles to the top picks list, as well:

Ford Flex: For fans looking for tons of room without getting an SUV, AAA Auto Buying experts suggest the Ford Flex. Its boxy styling delivers an exceptionally roomy interior that is perfect for passengers, coolers, grills and folding furniture. The EcoBoost engine, with its improved performance and better fuel economy (over the standard V-6), makes the Flex even more attractive as a spacious SUV alternative for tailgating. The TrueCar national average selling price of the 2011 Ford Flex with Ecoboost is $34,169, which is 9.8 percent less than the MSRP

Subaru Forester: For diehard fans that tailgate in any weather — be it rain, sleet or snow — they want a vehicle like the all-wheel-drive Subaru Forester that can get them through any conditions to the game. In addition to delivering exceptional value, this crossover utility vehicle offers lively engine response (in the turbo version), comfortable seating with room for four and above average ride and handling. In addition, the cargo area should be more than capable of handling the basic necessities for a good tailgating party. The TrueCar national average selling price of the 2011 Subaru Forrester is $20,537, 4.6 percent less than the MSRP.

Nissan Cube: The most untraditional pick by AAA Auto Buying experts for tailgating is the Nissan Cube. Its stylings may appeal more to college student or recent graduates, but it still provides amazing amounts of room for party food and tailgating gear. Additionally, the Cube has an exceptional turning radius and swing-out tailgate that will make maneuvering and setup in a crowded parking lot a breeze. The TrueCar national average selling price of the 2011 Nissan Cube is $14,697, which is 5.2 percent less than the MSRP.

AAA’s top picks are selected by its AAA Auto Buying experts who test drive and evaluate hundreds of vehicles each year. AAA provides free vehicle reviews, localized pricing information and more for consumers online at AAA.com/AutoMaker. Additional information on AAA Auto Buying is available at AAA.com/AutoBuying.

TrueCar is the AAA preferred supplier for new car pricing data for the motor club. TrueCar is a trusted source for car buyers and car dealers, providing what other people actually paid for a vehicle within the last 30 days, locally, regionally and nationally using multiple, and even duplicate sources to gather and authenticate their data. Those in the market for a new vehicle can configure the vehicle they want and get the TrueCar average selling price at AAA.com/AutoMaker. Vehicle pricing will vary based on trim packages, and prices included with the top picks are based upon specific trim.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 52 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

ORLANDO, Fla., March 16, 2011

Nation’s largest motor club offers tips to owners and potential buyers of flood-damaged cars

Heavy rain and rapidly melting snow can lead to vehicle flood damage, which often results in difficult and expensive repairs. To avoid causing additional problems, AAA cautions motorists that a flood-damaged car should not be started until a thorough inspection and cleaning has been performed.

“In addition to the obvious damage done to upholstery and carpeting, flood water is a corrosive and abrasive mixture of water and dirt that works its way into every seam and crevice of a vehicle,” said John Nielsen, AAA National Director of Auto Repair, Buying Services and Consumer Information.

“Most vulnerable are the engine, transmission and drivetrain, along with the fuel, brake and power steering systems. Unless dirt and other contaminants are completely removed from these important vehicle components, increased wear and premature failure can result,” Nielsen said.

Before attempting to start a flood-damaged car, a qualified technician should:

  • Inspect all readily accessible mechanical and electrical components, and systems that contain fluids, for water contamination.
  • Drain floodwater from contaminated components and systems, flush with clean water or an appropriate solvent, and refill with new clean fluids of the proper type.
  • Inspect, clean, and dry electrical system components and connections.

If a car has been completely or partially submerged, extensive disassembly may be needed for a thorough cleaning. Depending on the vehicle make, model and age, the cost of such an effort may exceed the car’s value. AAA encourages motorists to contact their insurance companies first for help in determining the best course of action when dealing with a flood-damaged vehicle.

“The car’s electrical system also is subject to flood water damage,” Nielsen explained. “Engine computers, sensors, sound systems and other electronic devices can sometimes be salvaged, but unless they are thoroughly cleaned and dried, inside and out, problems caused by corrosion and oxidation may occur weeks or even months after the flooding.”

Many parts of a car are difficult to clean and dry because they are hard to access. Door locks, window regulators, wiring harnesses, heating and air conditioning components and many other small devices are tucked away in hidden spaces. These items may work okay initially following a flood, only to fail at a later date due to contamination by dirty water.

“Restoration of a flood-damaged car can be as extensive and expensive as restoring a classic,” Nielsen warned. “Compare the value of the vehicle to be restored to the cost of restoration before proceeding with flood-related repairs.”

In many cases, insurance companies “total” flood damaged vehicles which are then sold to salvage companies. However, rather than being disassembled for parts, some of these vehicles end up being purchased by individuals who restore them to operating condition—with varying levels of expertise. AAA warns car buyers in all parts of the United States that flood-damaged vehicles can be shipped anywhere for resale, and they often continue to appear in the marketplace for many months following a major flood.

The best protection against buying a flood-damaged vehicle is a thorough pre-purchase inspection by a qualified shop such as a AAA Approved Auto Repair facility. Nearby locations can be found at AAA.com/Repair. As part of their inspection, the shop will look for common indicators of flood damage such as dried mud under the hood or in body cavities inside the trunk. A damp or musty odor in the vehicle is another frequent warning sign, and new carpeting and upholstery in an older car can be a red flag calling for closer inspection.

Another good practice that can help prospective buyers avoid flood-damaged cars and trucks is the purchase of a vehicle history report. While such reports don’t always catch everything, more often than not they will indicate when a vehicle has been in a flood or been issued a salvage title, indicating a major problem in its past.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 52 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

 

ORLANDO, Fla., February 10, 2011

As the winter snow and ice begin to melt, unpleasant potholes can begin to appear and become a threat to vehicles

Christie HydeWhen winter’s snow and ice finally melt away, they invariably leave behind an unpleasant reminder of this winter’s severe storm season—potholes.
“Major winter storms have affected much of the country this season. While many motorists’ cars have made it through the winter storm season unscathed, they could still fall victim to a pothole left in its aftermath,” said John Nielsen, director, AAA Auto Repair and Buying Programs.

Potholes form when moisture collects in small holes and cracks in the road surface. As temperatures rise and fall, the moisture expands and contracts due to freezing and thawing. This breaks up the pavement and, combined with the weight of passing cars, eventually results in a pothole.

Additional Resources

To aid motorists in protecting their vehicles from pothole damage, AAA recommends the following:

Inspect Tires – The tire is the most important cushion between a car and a pothole. Make sure tires have enough tread and are properly inflated. To check the tread depth, insert a quarter into the tread groove with Washington’s head upside down. The tread should cover part of Washington’s head. If it doesn’t, then it’s time to start shopping for new tires. When checking tire pressures, ensure they are inflated to the manufacturer’s recommended levels, which can be found in the owner’s manual or on a sticker on the driver’s door jamb. Do not use the pressure levels stamped on the sidewall of the tire.

Inspect Suspension – Make certain struts and shock absorbers are in good condition. Changes in vehicle handling, excessive vibration or uneven tire wear can indicate bad shocks or struts. Have the suspension inspected by a certified technician if you suspect problems.

Look Ahead – Make a point of checking the road ahead for potholes. An alert driver may have time to avoid potholes, so it’s important to stay focused on the road and not any distractions inside or outside the vehicle. Before swerving to avoid a pothole, check surrounding traffic to ensure this will not cause a collision or endanger nearby pedestrians or cyclists.

Slow Down – If a pothole cannot be avoided, reduce speed safely being sure to check the rearview mirror before any abrupt braking. Hitting a pothole at higher speeds greatly increases the chance of damage to tires, wheels and suspension components.

Beware of Puddles – A puddle of water can disguise a deep pothole. Use care when driving through puddles and treat them as though they may be hiding potholes.

Check Alignment – Hitting a pothole can knock a car’s wheels out of alignment and affect the steering. If a vehicle pulls to the left of right, have the wheel alignment checked by a qualified technician.

Recognize Noises/Vibrations – A hard pothole impact can dislodge wheel weights, damage a tire or wheel, and bend or even break suspension components. Any new or unusual noises or vibrations that appear after hitting a pothole should be inspected immediately by a certified technician.

To help consumers identify quality auto repair shops that can maintain and repair their vehicles, AAA established the Approved Auto Repair program as a free public service. Approved Auto Repair shops are inspected by AAA automotive specialists and must meet and maintain high professional standards for technical training, equipment, cleanliness and customer service. Customers of approved shops are continually surveyed, and every approved facility must maintain a 90 percent or higher customer satisfaction score in all areas. Consumers can locate nearby AAA Approved Auto Repair facilities online at AAA.com/Repair.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 52 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

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