Posts Tagged ‘Lane Departure Warning System’

Erin SteppAAA Advises Drivers to Know the Limits When Using Blind Spot and Lane Departure Systems

ORLANDO, Fla., (December 9, 2014) – AAA’s Automotive Engineering experts are confident new advanced driver assistance technologies like blind-spot monitoring and lane-departure warning systems have great potential to keep drivers safer, as long as motorists are aware of system limitations.  As part of AAA’s auto technology series, these two systems were recently evaluated. While the systems performed effectively in multiple situations, this evaluation uncovered scenarios where the systems failed to perform as expected. This included delayed warnings by the blind-spot monitoring technologies and lane-departure warning systems failing to track the lane under certain road conditions.

AAA’s research, conducted with the Automobile Club of Southern California’s Automotive Research Center, found that:

  • Blind-spot monitoring systems had difficulty detecting fast-moving vehicles – such as when merging onto a busy highway. Alerts were often provided too late for evasive action.
  • Motorcycles were detected by blind-spot monitoring systems 26 percent later than passenger vehicles.
  • Road conditions were often a problem for lane-departure warning systems. Worn pavement markers, construction zones and intersections can cause the lane-departure warning system to lose track of lane location.
  • The litany of alerts and warnings could be confusing.  Auditory, visual or haptic responses – or a combination – could be similar to other advanced driver assistance features that delivered the same warnings.

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“With nearly three-quarters of 2014 vehicles offering blind-spot detection and 50 percent offering lane-departure warning as options, it’s key that consumers are educated on how to get the best benefit from these systems,” says John Nielsen, AAA’s managing director of Automotive Engineering. “AAA’s tests found that these systems are a great asset to drivers, but there is a learning curve.”

Test-track and on-road evaluations also highlighted system performance differences between test vehicles. “Some blind-spot monitoring systems we tested had a short detection range, which meant that a vehicle was already in the blind spot before the alert came on,” says Megan McKernan, Manager of Automotive Engineering at the Automobile Club of Southern California. “The lane-departure warning system on several vehicles experienced false-positive and miss-detections, which resulted in an inconsistent driver warning.  This can be annoying and could result in the driver disabling the system due to the false alerts.”

Pros and cons aside, motorists will encounter advanced driver assistance technology as automakers cascade these devices across vehicle lines. Being aware of these systems and understanding how they operate is a necessary step before driving the vehicle.

“As travelers head out for holiday visits, they may be renting a vehicle equipped with blind-spot monitoring or lane-departure warning systems,” says Nielsen. “It’s important to take the time to review these systems so that you’re prepared for alerts and warnings and understand the limits of the technology.”

In addition to AAA’s Automotive Engineering evaluation of these systems, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety has also provided an assessment of lane-departure warning systems, along with six other advanced technologies, in the August 2014 report Evaluating Technologies Relevant to the Enhancement of Driver Safety. Conducted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab, this study rates not only the potential for lane-departure systems to reduce crash fatalities but also rates how this advanced driver technology has actually performed based on the limited data currently available.  Motorists can review the AAA Foundation’s rating for new in-vehicle technologies, along with extensive informational material, at https://www.aaafoundation.org/ratings-vehicle-safety-technology.

Additional information regarding AAA’s research on blind-spot monitoring and lane-departure warning systems is available on the AAA Newsroom.

AAA conducts proprietary research to better understand and communicate to members the implications of automotive technology, design and functionality.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 54 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

New vehicle technologies expand to more affordable makes and models

ORLANDO,Fla., (March 1, 2012) – For 2012, the largest trend in new vehicle technology is the availability of innovative and advanced technologies, once offered exclusively in luxury vehicles, to many more motorists on the road. The list includes a variety of features all intended to improve safety, increase performance and reduce environmental impact.

“Technologies like anti-lock braking and stability control were once seen as pioneering innovations and are now required or standard features,” said John Nielsen, AAA’s Director of Automotive Engineering and Repair. “Looking to the future, we hope the cost for these technologies continues to come down, allowing more drivers to enjoy the safety, economy and performance they provide.”

AAA’s experts do warn that the increasing use of technology in many automobiles can create unintended consequences. “These new technologies can be distracting to a driver. It’s important to comply with the guidelines provided for their use and most importantly keep driving your car the number one focus while operating the vehicle” Nielsen said.

Some of the trickled down trends seen by AAA in new vehicle technology include:

Brake Assist-This feature, now standard equipment in some vehicles, recognizes when a driver has just instituted an emergency stop. The system then applies full braking power, even if the driver has not pressed the brake pedal hard enough to do this. If the driver backs off the brakes, the system steps out of the picture. This feature was first offered in some vehicles in the mid-90s after studies showed that even experienced drivers were reluctant to use all the braking power built into their vehicles during an emergency.

Parking Proximity Warning Systems and Backup Cameras- These features let a driver know when he or she is getting close to an object and/or show the path the car is taking. Using sensors, the warning system identifies items, animals or people, including small children that the driver cannot see because his or her view is blocked by parts of the vehicle. The backup camera shows the area directly behind the vehicle when in reverse. Originally a luxury car exclusive, today parking sensors and back up cameras are far more common, even on popularly priced vehicles.

Lane Departure Warning Systems- A safety feature that lets a driver know they have begun to cross over lane markers without signaling, lane departure warning systems use cameras to sense the lane markings on pavement. It will issue a warning that can be audible or take the form of a vibration in the steering wheel.Originally offered on top Infiniti models, today, lane departure warning systems are more widely available.

Active Cruise Control– This feature, once a luxury car exclusive, uses radar or laser to maintain a set distance from the car ahead. If a driver using such a system encounters slower traffic, the cruise control will automatically reduce speed by backing off the throttle. If the traffic clears or speeds up, the active cruise control will return to the driver’s original speed. Newer systems can also apply the brakes when needed to maintain a safe following distance. In some cases the active cruise control system will actually bring the car to a stop if the traffic ahead stops. Active cruise control is now offered as an option on a wide range of vehicles, including those that cost less than $30,000.

Stop-Start- Stop-start is a feature that is well known to any hybrid vehicle owner and drivers in Europe. This technology automatically stops the gasoline engine while the driver waits for a red light to turn green. It saves fuel while reducing emissions. Kia may soon bring this technology to non-hybrid applications in two of their low-priced cars, the Soul and Rio.  Expect expanded use of this technology in the next few years as vehicle manufacturers’ work to meet the higher Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards set for 2016.  

Driver Alert Warning System– Driver alert warning systems, originally introduced on costly luxury models, looks for signs of an inattentive or tired driver.  There are several ways to monitor the alertness or attention of a driver that range from lane departure to monitoring the driver’s movements via cameras.  Despite differences in monitoring technology, when the vehicle senses drowsiness or inattention, it warns the driver to take a break.

Blind Spot Warning Systems– This warning system uses a radar or camera to detect and warn a driver that another vehicle is lurking just out of view in an adjacent lane. Often, an amber light on the appropriate mirror is illuminated when a vehicle is in the driver’s blind spot. If the driver signals to move in that direction, an audible alert or flashing light is activated as a warning. First seen in costly vehicles, it is now standard equipment is some family vehicles, including several Mazda models.

Weight Reduction– Weight reduction is an important feature for all automakers regardless of make or model. This is one area in which lower-priced cars were the pioneers while many luxury car makers and buyers stuck to the theory that heavier is better. Today, luxury cars from makers such as Audi and Jaguar have adopted aluminum and other lightweight materials to reduce weight. The benefit of lower vehicle weight is better performance from the same engine and suspension package and increased fuel economy in all driving conditions. 

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 53 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

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